Oh, I didn’t know that you were sick

When you have a chronic illness, sometimes you’re not always in control of what happens to your body.

One of the symptoms of Hashimoto’s Disease is unexplained weight gain, which is something (for me) that’s pretty noticeable. Honestly, whether or not I had gained wright is really none of anybody’s business but they always felt that they were entitled to point it out to me as if I didn’t already know.

“You’ve gained weight since we first met.”

“I see that you’ve finally put one some weight.”

“I thought you were trying to lose weight?”

“You were so tiny freshman year.”

These comments can be hurtful, especially from family members or “friends”. I got tired of hearing them, so I started telling the truth.

“Yeah I did, because weight gain is a symptom of my thyroid disease.”

This always surprised them. A lot of times the response was not “are you okay” or “how are you coping?” but “Oh. I didn’t know that you were sick.”

You’re right. You didn’t know. But that doesn’t excuse the things that you said. In fact, it’s the reason why you shouldn’t have been so judgmental. You have no idea what I’ve dealt with, what contributes to this disease, how it makes me feel, or what it does to my body. Yet, you still felt that you had the right to call me out on something that I can’t even control.

So the next time that you want to express your disapproval over my body, do me a favor. Don’t.


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About Bookmark Chronicles

Hi! I'm Rae. 23. Avid Reader, Book Blogger. Intersectional Feminist. Gryffindor.
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14 Responses to Oh, I didn’t know that you were sick

  1. I deal with it everyday. But, thrive gives me more energy, sleep better, feel great Check out my amazing product. Make a free account on my website http://sunshines.le-vel.com

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  2. This post gives me so much hope. I deal with this almost on a daily basis. Every time I meet someone after a while, specially family, their first words aren’t “how are you doing?” They’re “wow, you seem to have put on some weight.” Really?! I had absolutely no clue. Thanks for pointing that out for me. It’s sad how we’ve all become so numb to the things we say to each other.
    Great post, Rae!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Honestly I hate it when people make comments about how MY body has changed since I’ve last seen them. For a year and a half I suffered from anorexia (which was caused by my medication for my sleeping disorder) I went to countless therapy sessions, dietician appointments, I was on a ridiculous amount of vitamins. I got given food supplements (formula) and it got to the point that I had to drink fat (I cant remember what it was called but it was disgusting) and I remember people complimenting me and congratulating me on loosing all this weight while my dietician told me to do no more exercise because I was loosing so much weight. the only people who got it were my mum and my close friends, they encouraged me to eat and would make sure I was eating.
    I’m now in proportion and my eating habits are healthy.
    I hated having people commenting on my body and how much I was eating and how much weight I’d lost. It makes me really upset that while I was struggling people just kept judging my body and believed I was healthy because I was so thin, when I wasn’t.
    I wish people weren’t so quick to judge and believe that sick looked a certain way, it can really effect people who are struggling with a disability and people just don’t get that.
    Thank you so much for making this post. I want you to know that we’re all here for you because you don’t deserve to have ignorant people judge YOU based on YOUR body
    – Yasmin

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Pingback: November Wrap Up! 2016 | bookmarkchronicles

  5. nosyjosie says:

    I love that you wrote this. People need “blunt” sometimes. We’ve gotten so comfortable being judgmental, insensitive, and just rude altogether. Far too often we don’t care about how our words impact other people until someone makes us feel like a “butt.” I’m sorry about your struggle also – a friend of mine had the same health issues when we were in high school. She would love this post.

    Liked by 1 person

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