Why Straight People Don’t Need To Celebrate Being Straight

As a straight person, I get pissed when people say “there should be a national day for straight people” NO. There shouldn’t be because that’s pretty much every day that isn’t reserved for the LGBTQIA+ community so sit down, shut up, and stop trying to take away from their celebration just because you feel left out. Everything isn’t about you.

dano1979blog

Today is National Coming Out Day, a day when gay and lesbian people talk about their experiences of revealing their sexuality to their family and friends.

And not to feel left out right wing wankers are rushing to troll the #Nationalcomingoutday hashtag on Twitter with the ever so insightful observation that it’s cool for gay people to be proud for being gay but not cool for straight people to demonstrate their pride in being hetrosexual.

Oh dear oh dear!

But why can’t straight people be proud of being straight? Well the answer to that is it’s not so much they can’t rather than they don’t need to.

You see being straight and hetrosexual is still considered the norm even in our supposed enlightened liberal Western societies. Gay people need things like Gay Pride and National Coming Out Day because they are still fighting against a society that considers being homosexual…

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About Bookmark Chronicles

Hi! I'm Rae. 23. Avid Reader, Book Blogger. Intersectional Feminist. Gryffindor.
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10 Responses to Why Straight People Don’t Need To Celebrate Being Straight

  1. As a queer lady, I absolutely agree. Straight people are pandered to in every single aspect of life: tv, movies, music, theater, books, etc. The second that their spotlight starts to dim as the queer existence becomes more normalized, they start yelling at us for not making them feel special enough.

    Okay, I need to stop before I go on yet another rant. I am angry about MANY THINGS haha.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Your rant is more than welcome if you need to get it out, I don’t mind! You’re right, a lot of straight people don’t realize their privilege in the representation that have always had.
      There’s a poem called Dear Straight People by Denice Frohman that I think you would like (if you have heard it already) It’s on YouTube!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s interesting to read how an exceptionally small section of the population “need” what people are designating to be an august “national day” so to celebrate their narrow sexual preference as if it were their defining characteristic (surely we’re all deserving of more). I’m even reluctant to describe the LGBTQIA+ “community” as such, since how could so wildly diverse and clearly distinct person types be shoehorned into being described as if they were a community? Is being transgender anything like being questioning, how about the difference between gay men and bisexuals (they’re wildly different).

    If you and I were to write how people feeling same sex attraction/trans people “need” such days as national celebrations of their public expression of same sex attraction/perceived gender identity, that would be far from accurate, wouldn’t most reasonable people agree? It’s only needed insofar that we’re meaning to write, it’s needed so to minimise or stop what’s considered hatred of the LGBTQIA+ people groups. There’s an objective in mind, due to which there’s need. It’s not needed though outside of the objective, people who identify as same sex attracted could suffer in silence (although we would hate that), thus it’s truly “needed” in that we’re hoping to change attitudes towards these often reviled minority groups.

    However, as upsetting as it might be for many to read, the desires people in the LGBTQIA+ community experience are simply abhorrent desires and ways in which people define themselves, departing from both expected and experienced lifestyles of the general population. By which I’m meaning to write, they’re certainly abnormal desires, for which the people experiencing the desires are described as abnormal, that’s not necessarily to write that they’re wrong desires, since many extraordinary people are abnormal, although it’s something people who feel strongly about LGBTQIA+ rights should try and be understanding of. Surely the issue isn’t that we’re noticing our differences (what is a gay rights parade if not an attempt at celebrating difference), rather there’s an issue with how people are responding to the obvious things which are making us so distinct.

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    • I’m not sure what you’re getting at here so correct me if I’ve misunderstood. Are you saying that the LGBTQIA+ community doesn’t need a day because they are a minority population? No one said it was their defining factor, but it still a part of their identity and therefore important.
      Also, I disagree with your use of the term “abnormal” there is nothing wrong with being LGBTQIA+. Being “different” isn’t a bad thing but it is not synonymous with “abnormal”

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      • I’d very much enjoy clarifying. My messages aren’t meant to insist the size of some people groups either qualifies or disqualified their having a public celebration (I’d imagine that’s an awful benchmark). Rather, “need,” I’m sharing, can only properly be understood in light of an aim/desire. For example, for myself to approach you and explain “I need water!” only makes sense in light of my thirst (even my aim being to quench thirst), or an urgent desire to douse a fire etc (in short, there’s need due to our desires and aims). Nobody needs national recognition solely on account of being in the minority, you’re so unique as to be a minority of one, Rae. 🙂 You’re one of a kind (as am I). That’s not to write however we’re deserving of everyone’s attention with regards to our every facet. Why therefore does same sex attraction specifically and in spite of many other facets require attention? (An answer incoming).

        By way of the original article, which you’ve kindly shared, there’s an admission by the author not unlike my earlier explanation: “Gay people need things like Gay Pride and National Coming Out Day because they are still fighting against a society that considers being homosexual the norm.” To clarify, I’d imagine the original author meant to write: “a society that considers heterosexual the norm,” as opposed to “homosexual”.

        Outlining both LGBTQIA+ desires, and resultant needs which are produced by their desires, the original author wrote further: “They still have to fight against bigots and homophobes who preach hatred against gay people and they have to live their lives dealing with hostility from such bigots.” Therefore, national celebrations of queer expressions of identity are, according to the original author, an indispensable tool in their fight against people who might stand in their way (involving the victory of their aims and need at the expense of who’s perceived as being their opposition).

        For clarity’s sake however: I’ve not tried equating the words “abnormal” and morally “bad,” insofar as same sex attracted people are concerned (nor would I,) by abnormal I’m simply meaning to write atypical (which experiencing same sex attraction would accurately be described as). “normal” shouldn’t be use as if it were a trophy word to be won or stripped of meaning, like how many of my activist friends in the LGBTQIA+ community would prefer doing.

        About your earlier reply moreover, when you’ve shared how sexual preference happens to be important, methinks you’re meaning to write “in general” sexual and romantic preferences are considered important in the life of an individual whose orientation happens to be same sex attracted. Not everyone who experiences attraction to members of the same sex/gender identifies as “gay people,” rather they’re simply people who just so happen to be same sex attracted (thus also not LGBTQIA+ activists). Just imagine people who identified with having “Asian fever,” chubby chasers and gold diggers demanding national recognition on account of people who weren’t necessarily pleased by their behaviour, wouldn’t most people rightly find parades in which scantily clad men and women publicly gorged in an epic celebration of fat to be bizarre. Yet in terms of shoehorning wildly diverse people into an LGBTQIA+ “community” which lacks any true community element appears by people to be praised, even praised because activists are weaponizing public displays and national days so to silence so-called “bigots” who dare disagree.

        How exactly are people who agree with aggressive use of such national days defining the word “bigot”? In addition, how’re you yourself defining “bad,” wrong and immoral?

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      • While your response has answered some questions, it’s also created more.
        Are “atypical” and “abnormal” not synonyms? I personally do not agree with using these terms for people who don’t abide by such a broken society’s “standards”
        My comment about sexual orientation was not meant to be interpreted as “in general” It was in response to your statement about sexual preference being a defining factor. As in, I don’t believe that celebrating a part of your identity with a day makes it your defining factor.
        Sexual identity and orientation are also entirely different from fetishizing someone’s race or ethnicity and labeling it “Asian fever”
        While I am not a member of the LGBTQIA+ community, but an ally, from the interactions and experiences that I’ve had, it actually does seem that they are a community and support each other. If that’s not the case, I have yet to hear anyone say it.

        In a nutshell I’m curious as to if you agree or disagree with the original post. I’m under the impression that you have strong feelings on this subject as you have left the same original comment on at least 3 blogs. As a straight person I agree with the original author that straight people do not need to celebrate when they have never faced challenges surrounding their sexual orientation. Do you disagree with that?
        Also, please do not point out to me that I am a minority. I know.

        To answer your questions: I disagree with the idea that celebrating diverse communities is weaponizing them. I think it’s raising awareness and providing a safe space.
        I think that most people think of bigots as people who do not accept identities different from their own. A lot of times this particular group is on the receiving end of unpleasant interactions from people who would be considered bigots.
        Yes when you said abnormal and I interpreted as bad I was thinking “wrong”

        Did I answer your questions as you intended them?

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      • I’m curious as to how you could write I’ve posted my original observations on precisely three separate blogs, Rae. That’s not to write you’re mistaken, rather I’m curious as to how you’re aware when Carla Louise (who I have contacted) hasn’t actually green lighted my comment as of yet. Insofar as I’m aware my original comment can only be viewed by way of readers of either your blog or dano1979blog. Carla Louise, who as of your replies hasn’t posted my comment, replied by way of “F****** a” to the original article, whereas your reply was to tell people who disagreed to “shut up,” which leads into my reply.

        Wouldn’t an “unpleasant interactions,” be how Pride events, however beloved of the LGBTQIA+ activists, are often described (in addition to demands of “shut up,”)? For example, an official website for the promotion of a widely visited gay event (Southern Decadence) reminded event goers how albeit they’d “get an eyeful,” for having visited the event, “. . .city laws prohibit not only public urination, but also public sex acts.” Why would people need reminding of something so plain. Wouldn’t reasonable people be rightly bothered by “Big D**k” contests and giant penis floats, in addition to other events. Aren’t such events as the above best described as “unpleasent interactions,” like how you have explained. Unpleasant interactions which for having voiced a contrary opinion over good people are promptly silenced. You’ve charitable shared how public events and dedicated holidays in favour of same sex attraction and transgenderism are “celebrations,” I’d have to again redirect our attention to the author’s original article. Activists insist events and national days are “needed,” not for celebration’s sake but rather so to battle opposition voices:

        “Gay people need things like Gay Pride and National Coming Out Day because they are still fighting against a society that considers being [heterosexual] the norm. They still have to fight against bigots and homophobes who preach hatred against gay people and they have to live their lives dealing with hostility from such bigots.”

        As I’ve explained earlier, and how that the original author appears to concede, pride events and supposedly national days which are about an extremely narrow (around 1%) subsect of sexual desires experienced amid our population have an expressed purpose which includes closeting the views of nonconformists and rebel elements against LGBTQIA+ activist viewpoints. “Bigotry” and to behave as a bigot isn’t so narrowly defined as “people who do not accept identities different from their own,” rather an accurate description of “bigot” would predate LGBTQIA+ activism and queer directories altogether. Bigots are properly defined as people who are “strongly partial to their own group, religion, race, or politics and are intolerant of those who differ.” Through an accurate definition of what it means to practice bigotry, LGBTQIA+ activists and social justice warriors are so overbearing and vindictive as to be described as “bigots.” Activists won’t stop their parades and activities not because they’re such party animals (thus “celebrating,” isn’t an appropriate description of the “need,” for pride events), instead “weaponizing” would be wholly appropriate. Gay activists apparently cannot stand the fact that there are people who aren’t in agreement with their political and social blueprints for society (the very definition of bigotry).

        Are you and I bigoted for denying someone their ideal self when they are intensely experiencing amputee’s disorder, an unfortunate desire to create an ideal self by having healthy arms and legs removed. By your earlier definition of bigot I’m inclined to reply yes. To reply in love “No, I’m not going to help you remove your arms” would be cruel and hateful by your earlier reckoning. To which you might be shocked. Yet people are removing their breasts and having a blade taken to their private parts in some similar way every year.

        In answer to your question whether or not I’m in agreement with the author’s original article: Yes and no. Of course vulnerable, dearly loved people who have experienced same sex attraction have and are being insulted, abused physically, about which people outside of their circle need to be sympathetic. The problem of pain and belonging are wounds for which people want healing (though how?). “brokenness” isn’t to do with simply our society, but our every heart.

        Again you have shared how because experiencing same sex attraction (by our stats) isn’t normal, and due to “brokenness” concerning our society, you’d rather refuse to use words such as abnormal and atypical. You’ve tried to buck societal “standards” by a refusal to use words accurately, which leads nicely into an earlier question of mine which you appear to have overlooked: ‘how’re you yourself defining “bad,” wrong and immoral?’ To be judge, jury and executioners of society’s brokenness based upon sheer force of opinion sounds just extraordinary.

        Allow for my message to retrace our exchange ever so briefly, as you have shared how people who have experienced same sex attraction and lived out a transgender lifestyle found their identity in gayness or by body alternation. They’ve grounded identity in such facets as above. With which my reply explained how people who often experience much of the above don’t define themselves by public gayness.

        1 (your message). “No one said it was their defining factor, but it still a part of their identity and therefore important.”

        2 (my reply). About your earlier reply moreover, when you’ve shared how sexual preference happens to be important, methinks you’re meaning to write “in general” sexual and romantic preferences are considered important in the life of an individual whose orientation happens to be same sex attracted. Not everyone who experiences attraction to members of the same sex/gender identifies as “gay people,” rather they’re simply people who just so happen to be same sex attracted (thus also not LGBTQIA+ activists).

        “in general,” would be fair, insofar that people are nuanced in how they have decided to define themselves. You yourself define “bigoted,” as people who refuse to accept how other people define their identities, due to which let’s admit to people who have experienced same sex attraction yet don’t want to define himself or herself as homosexual or lesbian. To come full circle, gay activists have “need,” need understood in light of their bigotry to silence political voices which aren’t in agreement with gay activism. Even going so far as to redefine “bigot” as people who do not accept identities different from their own,” (so people who opposed gay and transgender activism). Under attack parades and advertisements made in the form of national days redefined as “celebrations” (which may involve merriment) these people work so to fulfill activist “needs,” an explicate need being to silence and end dissent.

        To be rightly described as “community” would mean to possess shared characteristics (which LGBTQIA+ people aren’t doing to the exclusion of their heterosexual neighbours,) or shared attitudes (which aren’t shared by everyone). Therefore, people experiencing homosexual desires, lesbian desires or transgender desires aren’t to be described as “community” in any recognizable sense (unless there’s another thread by which they’re joined).

        In closing you have asked whether straight people are in need of celebratory days so to further affirm their heterosexuality. For which I’d explain that’s entirely dependant upon “need,” people who are seething against gay activism certainly are in need insofar that they would rather see an end to such aggressive displays of homosexual advertising/“awareness” raising. As explained needs are understood in light of desires and resulting aims.

        You’re an altogether charitable and fine conversation partner thus far, 🙂 in answer to your question as to whether you have or have not answers my questions as intended: Your sincerity shines through.

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  3. Okay….. A lot of what has been said is entirely irrelevant to the conversation at hand. If you really must know, Carla told me about the comment and then I realized that you posted the same comment on my blog. From there, I figured that you probably posted on the original post as well and you did.
    I can see that this conversation is going nowhere so if you go back to my previous response you will see that I did not overlook your question. I answered it right there at the very end. You, on the other hand, have not provided me with a direct answer at all and for that reason I will no longer be responding.

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  4. Pingback: October Wrap Up! 2016 | bookmarkchronicles

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